OTC News Archive

University of Texas at Austin professors present inventions ready for the marketplace

College of Engineering
May 24, 2004

The University of Texas at Austin will showcase its latest technologies that are ready for prime time at the “Ready to Commercialize” event on May 25.

Presentations by university faculty members about their inventions in life sciences, engineering, nanotechnology and wireless communications highlight the program. It also includes discussions on intellectual property and structuring deals with the university, a look at the State of Texas’ technology initiatives and an update on the highly successful commercialization of a previous technology developed at the university.

Gov. Rick Perry and university President Larry R. Faulkner are scheduled to speak.

“The university is committed to getting its technology into the marketplace where it can build companies and create jobs,” said Neil Iscoe, director of the university’s Office of Technology Commercialization. “This ‘Ready to Commercialize’ lineup is full of technologies that are ready to go.”

Presenters of inventions include:

  • Professor Eric Anslyn, who developed quick indicator tests with applications many industries. They can be used to detect a wide range of chemical and biological problems.
  • Professor Ted Rappaport, who will talk about a new method of Internet wireless transmission that leapfrogs the current standards to establish entire wireless neighborhoods.
  • Professor Benny Freeman, who developed a membrane technology for cleaner fuels.
  • Professor Miguel Jose Yacaman, who will discuss his invention related to a superior process for the production of silver nanoparticles. The particles have broad uses in health care, textiles and food processing because of their bactericidal and fungicidal properties.
  • Professor Bill Mark, who will discuss software that enables computer game developers to produce better and more realistic images.
  • Marcus Ashford, who will talk about an on-board distillation system for gasoline-powered vehicles that reduces emissions by 50 percent to 75 percent. The National Society of Black Engineers named Ashford, who receives his doctor’s degree in mechanical engineering this week, its 2004 Graduate Student of the Year.
  • Professor Robert Van de Geijn, who will present software that dramatically decreases the cost of developing algorithms for high-performance computing.
  • Professor Christine Schmidt, who has developed a new nerve graft which could revolutionize the way trauma and accident victims are treated.
  • Eric Koehler, who will speak about a concrete testing device he and Dr. David Fowler developed to accurately and completely describe the characteristics of concrete. The current standard used is inadequate for the new mix materials which will soon dominate the market. This device may become the next standard field test device.
  • Professor Grady Rylander, who will present a new invention for non-invasive detection of eye disorders.

Besides the technology presentations, panelists will discuss various issues centered around licensing and deal structure within the OTC. Austin attorney Pike Powers will lead a panel of business and policy leaders in talking about the latest approaches to commercializing technology.

In another session, Professor Adam Heller will highlight his hugely successful start-up, Therasense Inc. The company, started around a university technology for monitoring glucose, was recently acquired by Abbott Labs for $1.2 billion.

Gold sponsors are Bickel & Brewer, Bracewell & Patterson, Fulbright & Jaworski, Gray Cary, Vinson & Elkins, and Winstead Sechrest & Minick. Silver sponsors are Arch Venture Partners, Baker Botts, Draper Fisher Jurvetson Mercury, David Powell Inc., Emergent Technologies Inc., Silicon Valley Bank, and Techxas Ventures.